• Lake Ontario Salmon Fishing Report, August 25

    Posted on August 24th, 2009 admin 1 comment
    Paul Collis with a hefty king salmon that hit a fly trailing a ProChip 11

    Paul Collis with a hefty king salmon that hit a fly trailing a ProChip 11

    When you’re aboard the Fish Doctor salmon fishing in Lake Ontario, you’ll notice one thing…, 11″ ProTroll flashers and Fish Doctor Sushi Flies rule in late August and early September.

    One of the reasons…, big flashers catch bigggg staged kings.    With a $20,000 LOC Derby grand prize up for grabs thru September 7,  biggg kings are where it’s at!

  • Lake Ontario Salmon Fishing Tip, Sushi Flies

    Posted on August 17th, 2009 admin No comments
    An early morning king that hit a Purple Passion flasher and glow green Fish Doctor Sushi Fly on August 13, 2009.

    An early morning king that hit a Purple Passion flasher and glow green Fish Doctor Sushi Fly on August 13, 2009.

    If you’re not fishing 11″ Pro-Troll flashers and Sushi flies for Lake Ontario salmon, you’re missing a bet.  These 11-inch “Big Guys” and flies baited with Familiar Bite alewife strips have been our go-to rigs aboard the Fish Doctor lately.  If  you’ve fished cut bait behind these big attractors in the past, you know the color combos.

  • Lake Ontario Salmon Fishing Report, August 12, 2009.

    Posted on August 12th, 2009 admin No comments

    Lake Ontario salmon fishing has had it’s ups and downs in the past week since August, 6, 2009.

    If you had been onboard the Fish Doctor on August 6 with the Huttner party, you would have thought you were in salmon heaven.  With kings scattering in the 140t0 160 foot area west of Oswego where Capt. Ernie had been fishing the previous three days, it was time to do something different.  Shortly after departing the dock at 5:00 AM, the Fish

    This Lake Ontario salmon made Ron work up a sweat when it hit a Prochip flasher and fly on 500 feet of copper

    This Lake Ontario salmon made Ron work up a sweat when it hit a Prochip flasher and fly on 500 feet of copper

    Doctor was on plane headed northwest of Oswego Harbor to deep water in search of bait, kings, and steelhead.  With the fish finder basically void of any fish marks after a 20 minute ride, the Huttner crew was on the verge of mutiny.  But as we approached 500 feet of water, the 10″color Sitex lit up with the marks of alewife schools, kings, and steelhead.  A few hours later, with a limit catch of kings and steelhead in the coolers, the Fish Doctor was headed back to Port. 

    After three days of good fishing in deep water, the bait and kings scattered and it was back to hunting mode.  On August 11, the Norris party from Maine found themselves in king salmon heaven once again, with good numbers of kings in 130 feet of water.  Jessica, Ron, and Jeremy caught some dandies that day.  Anxious to return to the same area, the crew was surprised that the fish were gone, with a tally for the first couple hours of fishing of 0 for 2.  A catch of browns up to 9 lbs. and a 14 lb. laker saved the day.

    The king salmon fishing the past week?  Definitely a riches or rags deal.  When will the mother lode show up???

  • Lake Ontario Fishing Charters, Safety, Fun, Then Fish

    Posted on August 1st, 2009 admin No comments
    Carol Angel on an August 1, 2009, Lake Ontario salmon fishing charter.

    Carol Angel on an August 1, 2009, Lake Ontario salmon fishing charter.

    When it comes to Lake Ontario fishing charters for trout and salmon aboard the Fish Doctor with Captain Ernie, there are three primary priorities…, safety, fun, and, then, fish.

    As the Fish Doctor departed the dock at 5:00 AM on the morning of August 1, 2009, with repeat customers Bill and Carol Angel and their kids, Will and Jen, those priorities were exactly what we were discussing.   First I was stressing safety, especially that the boat, with it’s twin V-8s was very seaworthy with countless hours spent below deck on preventive maintenance, plus a midseason out-of-water hull check, routine marine surveys, etc.    The nautical rule of thumb, is for every hour you spend fishing/boating on the water, you spend a half hour off the water or at the dock on maintenance of boat and gear.  Electrical storms and high winds with rough seas would be the only conditions that would keep us off the water, and those conditions hadn’t been forecast for 8/1/09.  Safety aboard Great Lakes charter boats is not automatic, and there are many horror stories involving poorly maintained, poor condition, and uninsured vessels getting into trouble and endangering customers.

    Fun, the captain’s second priority, would not be a problem with the Angel’s.  I knew from past experience that they would have a good time no matter what.    They enjoyed just being out of the water and “getting out of Dodge”.  They were already having a great time before we ever left the dock.

    Then, there’s the third priority…, fish.  What it boils down to is that catching Great Lakes trout and salmon is actually automatic for an experienced, successful captain.  That’s not to say that trout and salmon are actively feeding 24-7 or that a captain always can locate large concentrations of fish in every situation in 200-mile long Lake Ontario, but given halfway decent conditions, a veteran captain is going to put at least a few fish in the boat for his customers on almost every trip. 

    Knock on wood, but so far in the 2009 season, after about 85 trips, the Fish Doctor has not returned to the dock with

    a skunk in the box!