• Lake Ontario Trout and Salmon Fishing…, Fishing the Slide Diver and Lite Bite Slide Diver

    Posted on April 12th, 2019 admin No comments

     

    A late April brown that hit a lemon lime flutterdevle 30' behind a slide diver.

    If you troll for trout and salmon, and haven’t tried the Slide Diver or the Lite Bite Slide Diver you should.  They are a real fish catcher onboard the Fish Doctor, and have  been smokin’, especially in the spring,  ever since I started using them

     Anglers who troll for trout and salmon are familiar with directional diving planers like the Dipsy Diver.  These planers attach directly to monofilament,  braided, or wire line and take your bait or lure down to target depths. The adjustable rudder on many of these  diving planers directs them to port or starboard of the boat.   These types of planers use water pressure against the angled surface of the diver to take the diver and the attached leader and lure to depth. 

     A drawback to standard diving planers…, the length of the leader training them is limited to a maximum of about eight feet or whatever length an angler can handle when the planer is reeled to the rod tip while landing a fish.  This is where the Slide Diver parts company with all other available directional and nondirectional diving planers.

     Slide Divers differ from all other diving planers and  are a major part of my trout and salmon arsenal aboard the Fish Doctor for one reason.  They are inline planers, that is the line passes through them and can be locked in place any distance ahead of the lure.  This allows a lure to be fished at any distance behind the Slide Diver, a huge advantage when trolling for boat shy trout or salmon just below the surface.  In many cases, a trout or salmon in the top 30 feet or less of water won’t hit a lure fished on a 6’to 8’ leader behind a diving planer.  Set that lure back 20’ or more and lock your line in place in a Slide Diver, though, and you’ll catch fish. 

     The Lite Bite Slide Diver is an improved version of the Slide Diver that has a different trigger mechanism, allowing even the smallest trout or salmon to release the trigger, avoiding dragging small fish behind the planer undetected.

     The setup I’ve used this spring on Lake Ontario to fish Lite Bite Slide Divers is a 9’ medium heavy rod with standard guides, and an ABU Garcia 7000 Synchro line counter reel spooled with 40 lb. test Berkley braided line. The braided line is slipped through an 8 mm. bead and attached to 6’ of 15# to 20# test fluorocarbon leader with a barrel swivel.   The rudder on the Slide Diver is adjusted to the #3 setting taking the diver as far away from the boat as possible.  Spoons are normally fished 20 to 40 feet behind the Slide Diver.  When any size fish hits the spoon, the trigger on the diver releases and the diver slides back to the bead ahead of the swivel, 6’ ahead of the spoon.

     You will appreciate one of the greatest  advantages of the Slide Diver when a steelhead or landlocked salmon hits and goes aerial, leaping across the surface.  Instead of dragging a solidly attached diving planer along with it, increasing the chance for the hook to pull free, the inline Slide Diver  slides freely on the line, never allowing the fish to pull directly against the diver.

     Chris Dwy and Bill Purcell will attest to the effectiveness of Slide Divers after fishing them aboard the Fish Doctor on May 7, 2012, to boat a limit of king salmon and brown trout.  With the last king of their limit thrashing in the net, three more kings hit.   Chris and Bill had a triple on, two on Slide Divers.  All three kings were released unharmed to thrill another angler another day.

     There is a bit of a learning curve involved with using Slide Divers, but they are so effective for trout and salmon, the time it takes to learn to use them is well worth it.

  • Lake Ontario Trout and Salmon Fishing…, If You Always Did What You Always Do

    Posted on April 12th, 2019 admin No comments

     

    A change in tactics put this silver king in the boat.

    If you always do what you always did, you will always catch what you always caught.  I remember that statement by Chip Porter, one of the best fishermen on the upper Great Lakes, when he and I were touring the states of Michigan and Wisconsin a few years back giving seminars for Chip’s Salmon Institute.

     The point he was making was although an angler may catch fish using the same technique that has produced for many years, it still pays to be versatile and experiment with new techniques and fishing gear.  Conditions might change in the waters you fish or the fishing there may fizzle altogether, and you might have to seek out new waters where your old technique doesn’t work as well.  Also, if you learn new techniques, you might be even more successful in your favorite waters, catching more and bigger fish.

     Back in the 1960s on 28 mile long Lake George in northeastern New York State, a top fishing guide named Doug specialized in hooking up his clients with bottom hugging lake trout.  His technique, jerk lining 7-inch Hinkley spoons on copper line was devasting for big lakers feeding on ciscoes up to 10 inches.  But, the ciscoe population diminished and smelt showed up in the lake in 1976 changing the predator/prey scenario.  Doug consistently caught plenty of lakers in the 1960s doing the same thing he had always done,  but when conditions changed, and smelt became the primary lake trout forage, he stayed on top of his game  by switching to smaller smelt size spoons.

    At the same time, 2 to 4 lb. rainbow trout were plentiful in Lake George, but Doug never fished for them, even though I consistently caught them fishing small Mooselook wobblers on leadcore line at moderate trolling speeds and at slower speeds on leadcore using small chrome/copper cowbells trailed 18 inches back by an F-4 fluorescent red Flatfish.  If Doug had changed his ways and added a single leadcore rig to his spread his clients would have caught more rainbows.  

    In the early 1970s, downriggers first became available commercially and I started doing something I had never done, leaving my copper  and leadcore rigs at the dock and experimenting with riggers in Lake George for trout and salmon.  There was a learning curve involved in fishing this new fangled gear, but it didn’t take long to figure things out.  Trolling medium size Mooselooks at moderate speed near bottom was all it took to catch lakers.  The only problem was most of these lakers were 5 lbs. or less and I knew as a fishery  biologist working on the lake that much larger lakers were there.

    Although I could have fished the same old way with Mooselooks and continued to catch small lakers on spoons at a moderate trolling speed, I wasn’t satisfied and continued to experiment with different downrigger techniques.  Surprise, surprise!  Yes, there were bigger, lazier, slow moving lakers there, and they could not resist an F-7 Flatfish wobbling along slowly,  inches off bottom, 4 feet behind an 8-inch chrome dodger attached to the tail of a fish-shaped downrigger weight.

    At the slow speed I was trolling for lakers, the same, small, 4-blade cowbell I used for rainbows on leadcore line caught suspended ‘bows just as well on light tackle when the cowbell was attached directly to a downrigger weight and fished with the same fluorescent red F-4 Flatfish trailing 18 inches behind the tail spinner of the cowbell at a water temperature of 61 degrees. 

    Not doing what I had always done with copper and leadcore line produced consistent combination catches of lakers and rainbows on much lighter tackle than I had been using.